Stjernen and Destiny – Maryport

Stjernen

Stjernen

Stjernen, which means ‘star’, was built in Girvan, Scotland in 1959. I have no information for Destiny below. There’s a lot of fascinating detail at the sea lock, the numbers in the stonework in particular.

Vast amounts of coal were transported to Ireland from Elizabeth and Senhouse docks during the 19th century. Timber, cotton and cattle also passed through this port and hundreds of ships were built here. Fletcher Christian, who led the mutiny on the Bounty, was associated with Maryport.

Now that an ‘Add Media’ button has been added to WordPress I cannot upload photos using Windows but manage ok with Safari. I don’t know what the problem is – does anyone have any ideas?

Destiny

Destiny

Maryport Sea Lock

Maryport Sea Lock

© Simon Howlett 2012. All rights reserved

7 thoughts on “Stjernen and Destiny – Maryport

  1. These are SO great Simon and I am delighted that you are doing them. Having grown up at the mouth of the Weser River, the locks, the boats, the mud, all look so familiar, and you must certainly be documenting something that has just about disappeared.

    • Hi Karen, thank you. Yes, each boat does seem to have a personality all of its own. The Helen Mona which I’ve made platinum prints of is no longer with us – broken up a few months ago.

      Served in the Royal Navy for 10 years up until 1994 and sailed as an engineer in the Merchant Navy ever since. Don’t go anywhere exotic anymore – just spend time in the North Sea these days! Did a Great Lakes trip in 1987 on HMS Fife – had a great time!

  2. Destiny was my grandfather’s boat originally, completed in 1963. Was built by Dickies of Tarbert in Tarbert Argyll. Originally TT42. Sadly never got to meet him but my father still has a small scale replica of the Destiny before she had any modifications done. More information in the book ‘Tarbert Fishing Boats 1925-75’ by Brian Ward.

    • Thanks for the information, Allan. Great to hear your grandfather and father have sailed on Destiny, a boat with so much character, wish they still made them like that.

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